Litha

Litha-Summer Solstice

Although the name Litha is not well attested, it may come from Saxon tradition — the opposite of Yule. On this longest day of the year, light and life are abundant. At mid-summer, the Sun God has reached the moment of his greatest strength. Seated on his greenwood throne, he is also lord of the forests, and his face is seen in church architecture peering from countless foliate masks.

The Christian religion converted this day of Jack-in-the-Green to the Feast of St. John the Baptist, often portraying him in rustic attire, sometimes with horns and cloven feet (like the Greek Demi-God Pan)

Midsummer Night’s Eve is also special for adherents of the Faerie faith. The alternative fixed calendar date of June 25 (Old Litha) is sometimes employed by Covens.

http://wicca.com/celtic/akasha/litha.htm

In Denmark, the solstitial celebration is called sankthans or sankthansaftenIt has been celebrated since the times of the Vikings by visiting healing water wells and making a large bonfire to ward away evil spirits. Today the water well tradition is gone. Bonfires on the beach, speeches, picnics and songs are traditional, although bonfires are built in many other places where beaches may not be close by (i.e. on the shores of lakes and other waterways, parks, etc.)

Below is a picture of a Danish midsummer bonfire on a beach.

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3A3839_Danes_singing_Midsommervisen_by_the_fire.jpg

Love and Light to you

≈Lori

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *